Frank Kumro

Frank Kumro

OSX 10.9.x and Memcached-libmemcached

If you are running OSX 10.9.x you will eventually run into trouble if you try to build the perl module Memcached-libmemcached. The issue is that the expriemental tr1 headers are not available with the llvm std::lib.

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Frank Kumro

Setting up Guard/Spork for Rails 4

Being able to have a quick feedback loop with your tests during development makes writing your tests first (or at the same time) a much better experience. I have been using Guard and Spork to create the quick feedback loop mentioned above.

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Frank Kumro

Books and updates

I’ve finally picked up a copy of The Lean Startup and I am pretty excited about it. All the reviews I have read have been great, so I have high expectations for this book. I also picked up Book Yourself Solid as I heard about it from the Ruby Freelancers podcast. The last few weeks their podcasts really fueled my curiosity for freelancing. Before I jump into freelancing I need to research it more and decide if it’s something that I would like to do full time.

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Frank Kumro

Catalyst API routing with Controller::Rest

At my day job we have a Perl API that we use for various tasks both internally and externally. The routing is pretty nifty so I thought I would share it, and hopefully it helps someone when it comes time for them to write an API.

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Frank Kumro

Custom headers with rest-client

I was trying to test one of our Restful API’s at work recently using rest-client and needed to send custom headers in the request. After reading the docs and not finding anything dealing with custom headers I decided to look at the code. If you take a look at rest-client/lib/restclient/request.rb you will see some good documentation for the class. The docs give you an example of how to use RestClient::Request.execute directly. This allows you to do such things as specify custom headers.

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Frank Kumro

Input devices are worth the money

As a developer I spend 8+ hours behind the keyboard, and it only makes sense that I choose a keyboard that is enjoyable to use. Previously I was using a Microsoft Comfort Curve 3000, but a cup of coffee ended that relationship. I didn’t hate using that keyboard, but I didn’t love it either. On Sunday I found myself in the hunt for a new input device, and after some searching I found that a mechanical keyboard would best suit me. I wanted the tactile feedback, and who doesn’t love the clicky clack like the old IBM keyboards. Newegg had a Rosewill keyboard with Cherry MX switches, but the reviews were not that favorable. Then I found Das Keyboard, but it was > $100. After some thinking I decided to give it a shot, with how much I use the keyboard it’s worth it to purchase a high quality piece.

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Frank Kumro

New Hardware Time!

I’ve finally made the decision to invest in a new development machine. The current “work horse” is a Dell E520 (linux version) from 2007. It has been running great, even has increased memory and an SSD for the OS. But now I need some more graphics fire power and that requires some faster pci-e slots. Build details below:

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